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J.S. Ostoja Kotkowski

1922 - 1994

Biography:

Born in Golub, Poland, Stan Ostoja Kotkowski completed studies at the Düsseldorf Academy of Fine Arts in Germany after winning a scholarship. In 1949 he migrated to Australia and after arriving in Melbourne, he enrolled at the Victorian School of Fine Arts National Gallery School under Alan Summer and William Dargie, before eventually settling in Adelaide in 1954.

His work included painting (instrumental in developing geometric art in Australia), photography, filmmaking, theatre design, fabric design, murals, kinetic and static sculpture, stained glass, vitreous enamel murals, op-collages, computer graphics, and laser art.

He was best known for his ground-breaking work in chromasonics, laser kinetics and 'sound and image' productions working in laser sound and image technology.

 

Ostoja’s work is, in many ways, just now being recognised for its early use of these varieties of media. In 2008, the archives relating to Ostoja’s work (held in the University of Melbourne’s Special Collections archive) were committed to UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register. This was a worldwide recognition of one of the world’s first true multi-media artists and the pioneer of both sound and light sculpture.

 

Represented

National Gallery of Australia, Art Gallery of South Australia, Art Gallery of Western Australia, National Gallery of Victoria, Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Society of Fine Arts, Cracow, Poland, Peter Stuyvesant Trust, USA, Australian National University, Monash University.

J.S. Ostoja Kotkowski art

Signed "Ostoja" and Dated "1965" Lower Right

In a review of Ostoja’s Op Art show in Sydney’s Gallery A (1966), James Gleeson described the work thus “These works are perfectly finished and as immaculate as things tooled by machinery instead of being shaped by fallible human muscle and tendon. Instead of emotion, there is a clinical exactitude. Op Art – and O.K is the Op-Artist par excellence – is never intended as a medium of communication: it is devised to explode among the nerve endings of the eye and produce a visual disturbance.”

 

 

Artwork Title:
Rado, 1965
Medium:
Op - Collage
Size:
122 x 122cm
Description:

Signed "Ostoja" and Dated "1965" Lower Right

In a review of Ostoja’s Op Art show in Sydney’s Gallery A (1966), James Gleeson described the work thus “These works are perfectly finished and as immaculate as things tooled by machinery instead of being shaped by fallible human muscle and tendon. Instead of emotion, there is a clinical exactitude. Op Art – and O.K is the Op-Artist par excellence – is never intended as a medium of communication: it is devised to explode among the nerve endings of the eye and produce a visual disturbance.”

 

 

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